FAQ’s

Q?

What is visual acuity?

A.

Acuity is the measure of the eye’s ability to distinguish the smallest identifiable letter or symbol, its details and shape, usually at a distance of 20 feet. This measurement is usually given in a fraction. The top number refers to the testing distance measured in feet and the bottom number is the distance from which a normal eye should see the letter or shape. So, perfect vision is 20/20. If your vision is 20/60, that means what you can see at a distance of 20 feet, someone with perfect vision can see at a distance of 60 feet.

Q?

Are there medical treatments for dry eye?

A.

For mild cases of dry eyes, home remedies such as artificial tears, use of a humidifier, and avoiding smoke may be sufficient to provide relief. In some cases, medications that cause dry eyes may need to be adjusted. Talk to your doctor before stopping or changing any medications.

In chronic or severe cases, medications and medical treatments may be needed.

  • Prescription medications such as Restasis (cyclosporine), Xiidra (lifitegrast), or steroid eye drops may be prescribed.
  • Lacrisert (hydroxypropyl cellulose ophthalmic insert) is a slow-release lubricant insert placed under the lower eye lid that liquefies over time, providing an all-day moisturizing.
  • A punctal plug is a small device inserted into one of the small openings (puncta) of tear ducts in the inner corner of the upper and lower eyelids so tears are unable to drain away from the eye.
  • In cases where dry eye is caused by meibomian gland dysfunction (MGD) an in-office procedure called meibomian gland expression may be performed in which a doctor squeezes the clogged contents from the meibomian glands.
  • The LipiFlow Thermal Pulsation System is an in-office dry eye treatment device that fits over the eyelids and applies heat to the lids to soften hardened meibum in the meibomian glands and pulsed pressure to the eyelids to open and express clogged glands.
  • Intense pulsed light (IPL) delivers short, intense bursts of light at specific wavelengths that results in changes in blood vessels near the surface of the skin. Originally developed for use in dermatology, it can help relieve dry eyes in some patients.

Q?

What restrictions should I put on my child’s screen time?

A.

In our world of technology, it can be hard to get away from all the screens. Too much screen time for your kids can lead to eye strain, headaches, neck and back issues, disruptive sleep pattern and so much more. Devices include cell phone, computer, tablet, TV, or anything with a digital screen. Our #1 Rule! Take a 20 second break every 20 minutes and look 20 feet away. ESTABLISH TIME LIMITS: Remember that kids do not have awareness of the time they spend on digital devices. They DO NOT self limit. Limit leisure time to 2 hours per day. Remind children to hold the device at a proper distance (a minimum of 12 inches from their eyes).

Adjust lighting: bright lighting to allow for best contrast during the day. Switch device to nighttime mode starting 2 hours before bedtime. Your Horvath Vision Care doctor can also prescribe computer glasses that will help protect their eyes from the blue light that comes off our computer screens.

Q?

What kind of sunglasses are best?

A.

Sunglasses block harmful UV light which cause cataracts. In addition to blocking UV light, Polarized sunglass lenses reduce glare from light reflecting off the surface of water or horizontal surfaces like roads. Anyone who is bothered by glare outdoors can benefit from these advanced sunglass lenses.

Q?

What is legal blindness?

A.

You are legally blind when the best corrected central acuity is less than 20/200 (perfect vision is 20/20) in your better eye, or your side vision is narrowed to 20 degrees or less in your better eye. Even if you are legally blind, you may still have some useful vision. If you are legally blind, you may qualify for certain government benefits.

Q?

Why is rubbing your eyes harmful?

A.

The support structure of your eye is collagen. Pressing down on your eye and rubbing stretches the collagen in and out which can cause the cornea to change shape and weaken. Excessive rubbing can:

  • Create more wrinkles and dark circles around your eye
  • Cause bacteria from your hands to enter the eye
  • Increase in your astigmatism
  • Force a foreign body deeper into the surface of the eye
  • May be a sign of allergic conjunctivitis

Q?

Is eye pain an emergency?

A.

Eye pain is not normal and is best to be evaluated by your Horvath Vision Care doctor. Eye pain can result from an obvious eye injury to a serious time-sensitive condition. Eye pain also is frequently accompanied by blurred vision, redness (bloodshot eyes) and sensitivity to light. Here are possible causes of eye pain:

  • Eye injury
  • Corneal ulcer
  • Corneal abrasion/foreign body
  • Sleeping in your contact lenses
  • Acute angle closure glaucoma

Q?

When should I have my child’s eyes examined?

A.

Horvath Vision Care recommends a child’s first exam at the age of 3. If all seems normal, then they are to return at age 5. A parent does not know if their child is seeing properly without an eye exam. Many states require an eye exam from an optometrist as a prerequisite to starting kindergarten, but unfortunately, Ohio does not. Learning is 80% visual and children with vision problems tend to have learning or reading difficulties. Although a child’s eye exam may not be exactly the same as an adult, we use objective testing to rule out nearsightedness (myopia) and farsightedness (hyperopia), visual perceptual problems, color deficiencies and lazy eye (amblyopia).

Q?

Why do my eyes burn and feel tired? What can I do about it?

A.

These are often signs of dry eye syndrome, a very common condition that seems to be affecting more people with the increased usage of computers and digital devices. Women are generally more prone to developing these symptoms, which worsen with age. Certain medications and health issues can also contribute to dryness. Dryness of our eyes may be caused by different factors and finding out the cause helps the doctors at Horvath Vision Care suggest the best treatment plan. There is no true cure for dryness but many treatments are available such as the use of artificial tears, nutritional supplements incorporating Omega 3, eyelid hygiene, prescription medications such as Restasis, Cequa, Xiidra.

Horvath Vision Care is one of the few practices that has the technology to actually measure the quality of your tears, using the TearLab Osmolarity System. No single treatment works for every individual so we customize treatments for each person and their specific condition.

In addition, we are excited to offer our patients a special treatment called thermal eyelid technology (TearCare) which opens blocked meibomian ducts and is a comfortable procedure done in-office.

Let Horvath Vision Care put a stop to your dry eye! Our doctors specialize in dry eye diagnosing and treatment.

Take Our Dry Eye Questionnaire

Q?

What if I develop an eye infection? Can your doctors treat me for this?

A.

Yes, our doctors have the proper equipment to evaluate and treat eye infections, injuries, and diseases. A red eye can have multiple causes and our doctors will recommend the proper treatment regimen. If necessary, the appropriate prescription for medication will be electronically sent to your favorite pharmacy.

Q?

I am a diabetic. Can Horvath Vision Care perform the comprehensive exam that my primary care doctor recommends?

A.

Absolutely. We provide dilated fundus exams with retinal photographs that can be used for future reference or sent to your primary care doctor. In addition, a report of your diabetic eye exam will be sent to your doctor. We will work together to ensure proper eye health and diabetic management. Diabetic eye disease may include diabetic retinopathy, diabetic macular edema, cataracts, and glaucoma. Over time, diabetes can cause damage to your eyes that can lead to poor vision or even blindness. If surgical intervention is required, we will refer you to the proper specialist.

Q?

What is the difference between an optometrist and an ophthalmologist?

A.

An optometrist is an independent primary health care provider who examines, diagnoses, treats, and manages diseases, injuries, and disorders of the visual system, the eye, and associated structures as well as identifies related systemic conditions affecting the eye. An ophthalmologist is a medical doctor or doctor of osteopathy who specializes in the medical and surgical care of the eyes.The eye doctors at Horvath Vision Care are optometrists and your front line in eye care. If referrals are needed, depending on the diagnosis, they will recommend the proper specialist to ensure you get the appropriate care.

Q?

Why do I need to have a contact lens fitting when I already wear contact lenses?

A.

Contact lenses are medical devices and your eyes need to be evaluated annually to make sure it is safe to continue wearing contact lenses. Our patients deserve the newest technology and to know all their options when it comes to contact lenses. Horvath Vision Care has the newest contact lens products including daily toric contact lenses, multifocal contact lenses, multifocal astigmatic contact lenses, Acuvue Oasys Transition lenses, color contacts and many boxes of contact lenses in stock, ready for you to take home with you today.

Q?

What is the expiration on a contact lens prescription? On a spectacle prescription?

A.

The Ohio Vision Professionals Board has established that contact lens prescriptions expire one year from the date of your last contact lens exam, but spectacle prescriptions can legally be filled up to two years.

Q?

Is a vision screening and an eye exam the same thing?

A.

Vision screenings can be administered by a doctor, but are often done by lay people. Screenings will produce both over-referrals and under-referrals. Parents should be aware that screenings have limitations. Vision screenings do not take the place of eye examinations, and will not detect all potential eye problems or diseases that a comprehensive eye exam can. Children should have their first eye exam at the age of 3 and then before starting kindergarten.

Q?

How often should I have my eye examined?

A.

Eyes should be examined annually. Your prescription may not have changed, but the health checks of the eye must be completed. Children’s eyes change as quickly as they grow, so yearly eye exams are preferred. Some patients with ocular or systemic conditions must be evaluated more often. Patients with diabetes, hypertension, high cholesterol or those taking plaquenil drug therapy or long-term steroids should definitely be evaluated each year due to the greater risk of eye disease.

Q?

I am on the computer all day. Are there special glasses I can get to help my eyes?

A.

Computers and digital devices aren’t going away and the hours we are on them continues to grow. Studies show 70% of American adults experience some form of digital eye strain due to prolonged use of electronic devices, including computers, tablets, and smartphones. To combat these effects, digital protection lenses offer a shield that reduces glare and filters the harmful blue light from digital screens and artificial light. Eye strain, blurred vision, headaches, trouble sleeping, and dry eye are all symptoms of excess computer usage. During your eye appointment, our doctors will assess device usage time and how it may be affecting your eyes in order to prescribe the best solution for you.

Horvath Vision Care